Author Archives

hannahdrake628

Hannah L Drake is a blogger, activist, public speaker, poet, and author of 11 books. She writes commentary on politics, feminism, and race and her work has been featured online at Cosmopolitan, The Bitter Southerner, Harper’s Bazaar and Revolt TV. In 2019 during Super Bowl Sunday, Hannah’s poem, "All You Had To Do Was Play The Game, Boy," which addresses the protest by Colin Kaepernick, was shared by film writer, producer and director Ava DuVernay, and then shared by Kaepernick. The poem has been viewed more than two million times.

Hannah’s commentary on life and challenging others to dream bigger have been recognized by First Lady Michelle Obama. Hannah Drake was featured on the Tom Joyner Morning Show with Jacque Reid to discuss her international movement, Do Not Move Off the Sidewalk, which addresses the power of holding your space. Hannah was selected by the Muhammad Ali Center to be a Daughter of Greatness which features prominent women engaged in social philanthropy, activism, and pursuits of justice. Hannah was selected as one of the Best of the Best in Louisville, Kentucky for her poem Spaces and recently was honored as a Kentucky Colonel, the highest title of honor bestowed by the Kentucky Governor recognizing an individual’s noteworthy accomplishments and outstanding service to community, state, and nation. Labeled as a change agent, Hannah’s message is thought-provoking and at times challenging, but Hannah believes that it is in the uncomfortable spaces that change can take place. “My sole purpose in writing and speaking is not that I entertain you. I am trying to shake a nation.”

Black People Are Always Waiting For Justice…

Judge Kemp played into the narrative that White women will always be seen as the victim. It is not Botham’s memory and justice for this life that is the focal point of the nation, but it is Judge Kemp’s response that is now the story.  It is now a story of Black people that have been victimized by White people offering White people forgiveness. It is now the story of Black people taking the obligatory high road even as we bury our loved ones.

Black Women Do Not Owe This World S#!t.

Black women have paid our dues in blood.
Black women are tired of cleaning up your messes!
Black women will no longer let you suck at the bosom of our brilliance.
Black women are not this nation’s mammy. Our titties are tired!
If you want to save this nation, take a long hard look in the mirror. Do not ask us to save you.

Never Again! My Spanx Nightmare!

I felt like I was indeed going to pass out. I thought for sure it was going to require the jaws of life to get me out of this get-up. Y’all I was racing home, and by this time my bra started to conspire with the Spanx, and I felt like I was wrapped in the grip of a boa constrictor. NEVER AGAIN!!

The 10 Stages of Facing Racism

In thinking about racism, I was reminded of the Five Stages of Grief (Denial, Anger, Bargaining, Depression, Acceptance) developed by David Kessler and Elisabeth Kübler-Ross. I realized that facing racism has a similar process. There are stages of facing the reality of racism.

#TrustBlackWomen Often Means #UseBlackWomen

Trusting Black Women is more than a catchy hashtag. It is more than a talking point on the campaign trail. Trusting Black Women is more than inviting a Black woman to the table without any leadership or decision-making authority. Do not invite me to the table if I am expected to sit pretty and poised with no power. Making a hashtag does absolutely nothing without clear motives and actions behind it.

Beyoncé  Is That B*+ch! PERIODT!

Let’s just get right into it – Beyoncé is THAT BITCH! PERIODTTTT!! ALL THE T’s!!  There is no greater living entertainer on the planet. Period. Before I take it back, I will add more to it.  Argue with your aunties and grandmas don’t argue with me.Beyoncé  came to Coachella to snatch all the vanilla, #FFFFFF, flower crowns and snatch them she did!