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hannahdrake628

Hannah L Drake is a blogger, activist, public speaker, poet, and author of 11 books. She writes commentary on politics, feminism, and race and her work has been featured online at Cosmopolitan, The Bitter Southerner, Harper’s Bazaar and Revolt TV. In 2019 during Super Bowl Sunday, Hannah’s poem, "All You Had To Do Was Play The Game, Boy," which addresses the protest by Colin Kaepernick, was shared by film writer, producer and director Ava DuVernay, and then shared by Kaepernick. The poem has been viewed more than two million times.

Hannah’s commentary on life and challenging others to dream bigger have been recognized by First Lady Michelle Obama. Hannah Drake was featured on the Tom Joyner Morning Show with Jacque Reid to discuss her international movement, Do Not Move Off the Sidewalk, which addresses the power of holding your space. Hannah was selected by the Muhammad Ali Center to be a Daughter of Greatness which features prominent women engaged in social philanthropy, activism, and pursuits of justice. Hannah was selected as one of the Best of the Best in Louisville, Kentucky for her poem Spaces and recently was honored as a Kentucky Colonel, the highest title of honor bestowed by the Kentucky Governor recognizing an individual’s noteworthy accomplishments and outstanding service to community, state, and nation. Labeled as a change agent, Hannah’s message is thought-provoking and at times challenging, but Hannah believes that it is in the uncomfortable spaces that change can take place. “My sole purpose in writing and speaking is not that I entertain you. I am trying to shake a nation.”

Before You Quote Dr. King To Feel Good (2022)

Dr. King wasn’t fighting, so you could dust off a quote, post it on social media one day out of the year and do nothing to advance race relations in this country. On this day and every day, I challenge White people do not just read the Dr. King quotes that make you feel good. Read Dr. King’s work in its entirety and ask yourself. “Am I contributing to the dream or helping to facilitate the nightmare?”

Black Women Are Always To Blame. Even In Death.

How is it that an innocent Black woman is being cast as a problem in Louisville? To even ask, “Did the Breonna Taylor protest hurt Louisville,” is egregious. As usual Black women are being blamed for the response while people ignore the action that ignited the protests. Why not ask, “Did the MURDER of Breonna Taylor Hurt Louisville?”  Why not ask, “Did the MURDER of Breonna Taylor Hurt Louisville?” 

Dear White People, Who Told You It Would Feel Good?

And my question to White people is, “Who told you it would feel good?” (Pause and answer that question. Sit and think about the person who told you it was going to feel good? Have you come up with any name? I want you to really reflect on who told you it was going to feel good.) Who made that promise to you because they told you incorrect information. Let me tell you the truth. Facing you is never easy.

“How Are You? No. I Mean Really, How Are You?”

Immediately my mind found the pathway back to when another friend met with me on Zoom. It was for a pre-call to a workshop that I was conducting for their organization, and they asked how I was doing. I said, “I am fine.” Then they asked, “No, really, how are you?” Even on that Zoom call, I fought back the tears. I lied, forcing a smile that I hoped looked genuine as I said, “I’m good. I’m good.” I am the strong one. I am not allowed to have bad days.

Dear KYGOP, Stop Using The Fear of Black People To Keep You In Office.

It is easy to sit in some office and send out an email when you have no skin in the game, but Black people and others have given their very blood, sweat, and tears trying to impact this city and state. In 2020 we were fighting for our very right to breathe. We were fighting Breonna Taylor – for a 26-year-old Black woman murdered in her home. And we are still fighting to find some point of restoration and reconciliation. Something it would be wise for the Louisville GOP to contribute to for the betterment of this city. But that isn’t your goal. Your goal is division. Your goal is to sow and water seeds of racism. Tell me, Louisville GOP, what fruit do you want to bear within this city? HAVE YOU NOT SEEN ENOUGH?! Are you living in the same Louisville that I AM?! Because I am tired. I want to live somewhere, where every day isn’t a fight. Where every day I don’t have to try to prove to you that my life matters. I want to live somewhere, where those in positions of power are not working overtime to divide us. Where those in power are not sending out emails to scare people into hating me because I am Black. I want to live somewhere, where we are not fighting to survive but for once, just once, we ALL work TOGETHER to create a world where everyone can thrive.