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hannahdrake628

Hannah Drake offers a powerful, inspirational message that has been heard in various arenas around the world. Hannah has had the distinguished privilege of opening for political and social justice activist, Angela Davis, National Book Award Winner and poet, Nikky Finney, author and motivational speaker, Iyanla Vanzant, honorable judge and TV personality, Judge Gregory Mathis, and rapper and music producer, BIG K.R.I.T. Hannah has served as a presenter at Ideas Festival at WKU and in Louisville, KY as a panelist with CNN chief national correspondent, John King. In April 2017, Hannah had the honor of curating an evening of performance artists for the Festival of Faiths entitled Compassion Rising which reflected how arts could have an impact on the compassion. In November 2017, Hannah’s poem Spaces was selected by the National Academy of Medicine to be featured in a national art exhibit that speaks to visualizing health equity. Also, Hannah was chosen as a 2017 Hadley Creatives, a partnership between the Community Foundation of Louisville and Creative Capital to help local artists build their professional practice, cultivate an expanded peer network and dedicate time for reflection and planning. In December 2017 Hannah was honored for her work by the Kentucky Alliance of Against Racist and Political Repression.

In 2014, she joined Roots and Wings, a dynamic group of artists that seek to bring social change to their community. In 2015 and 2016, Hannah Drake, along with the members of Roots and Wings were able to perform their written plays, The West End Poetry Opera and The Blood Always Returns, at the Kentucky Center for the Performing Arts.

“Always leave crumbs & footprints detailing your greatness for those that are coming behind you.”

In 2016, Hannah’s poem Formation poem went viral being shared over 20,000 times around the world. A lover of writing and social justice, Hannah’s new blog offers commentary on current events and has been viewed around the world. Hannah’s work is filled with passion and truth, believing that communication is indeed the beginning of change. Hannah is the author of several works of poetry, Hannah‘s Plea-Poetry for the Soul, Anticipation, Life Lived In Color, In Spite of My Chains, For Such A Time As This and So Many Things I Want to Tell You-Life Lessons for the Journey. Her debut novel Views from the Back Pew was received with stellar reviews and was performed on stage to a sold-out audience. Her follow-up novel, Fragile Destiny has been hailed as life-changing. Currently, Hannah is working on a new collection of poetry and life lessons, entitled Love, Revolution, and Lemonade. Her powerful, honest delivery has garnered her the nickname, "Brimstone." More information about Hannah can be found at her website www.hannahldrake.com.

“How Are You? No. I Mean Really, How Are You?”

Immediately my mind found the pathway back to when another friend met with me on Zoom. It was for a pre-call to a workshop that I was conducting for their organization, and they asked how I was doing. I said, “I am fine.” Then they asked, “No, really, how are you?” Even on that Zoom call, I fought back the tears. I lied, forcing a smile that I hoped looked genuine as I said, “I’m good. I’m good.” I am the strong one. I am not allowed to have bad days.

Dear KYGOP, Stop Using The Fear of Black People To Keep You In Office.

It is easy to sit in some office and send out an email when you have no skin in the game, but Black people and others have given their very blood, sweat, and tears trying to impact this city and state. In 2020 we were fighting for our very right to breathe. We were fighting Breonna Taylor – for a 26-year-old Black woman murdered in her home. And we are still fighting to find some point of restoration and reconciliation. Something it would be wise for the Louisville GOP to contribute to for the betterment of this city. But that isn’t your goal. Your goal is division. Your goal is to sow and water seeds of racism. Tell me, Louisville GOP, what fruit do you want to bear within this city? HAVE YOU NOT SEEN ENOUGH?! Are you living in the same Louisville that I AM?! Because I am tired. I want to live somewhere, where every day isn’t a fight. Where every day I don’t have to try to prove to you that my life matters. I want to live somewhere, where those in positions of power are not working overtime to divide us. Where those in power are not sending out emails to scare people into hating me because I am Black. I want to live somewhere, where we are not fighting to survive but for once, just once, we ALL work TOGETHER to create a world where everyone can thrive.

Understanding The Stages Of White Tears

Did I feel sorry for Abigail? NOT ONE BIT! White Tears do not move me. I add them to my coffee every single morning. I can spot women like Abigail a mile away because I understand the stages of White Tears. I was hardly impressed with her mediocre high school musical theatrics. In the police report, it states, “Miss Elphick seemed to acknowledge that she was wrong, saying she was concerned about losing her job and apartment if the video posted online.” That was ALWAYS her concern, not any mental breakdown. She was focused on herself because she attacked a Black woman. I knew what it was the minute she was fighting to conjure up some tears. There is absolutely NOTHING wrong with Abigail. She is an entitled White woman that knows how to play her role in America. Period.

Over 400 Women Shared What They Would Do At Night If They Weren’t Afraid.

It is like women are trapped when the sun goes down. We are not living our lives to the fullest, not because it is dark but because of men lurking in the dark. It is not the dark that frightens us; it is the fear of men’s actions in the darkness. I pray one day we live in a world where women can just live, and we do not have to be afraid of what lurks in the dark, who hides in the shadows, and things that go bump in the night..

Are You Suffering From Being “Excessively Black?”

Please know, being Excessively Black may lead to telling Karen to STFU, speaking about racism all the time, calling out racist bullshit. It may also lead to not giving a damn when confronting a racist, diarrhea of the mouth when calling a racist out, outstanding Twitter clapbacks, and dehydration from constantly drinking racist’s salty tears. If you feel like you are suffering from being Excessively Black, there is help. If you are experiencing symptoms of being Excessively Black, you do NOT have to suffer alone. Call 1-800-EFF-KARN for help!

Love, Trust, and Betrayal – The Evolution of Robin G.

But what do you do when heartbreak collides with your poetry?

What do you do when you get the phone call from the other woman?
What happens when a woman slides into your DM’s to let you know the person you sleep with every night has also been sleeping with them?
What happens when you see the text messages?
How do you process it when he is telling you the same things he tells her?
What do you do when the person you expected to spend your life with has shared themselves with another person?
What do you do when the love you had all seems like a lie?
How do you start to rebuild when the trust is broken?

Regarding Sen. Bill 211- You Got Me F*cked Up! Legislate That.

You do not get to demand that I respect my oppressor! You do not get to demand that I respect officers that have teargassed me for doing nothing but demanding justice! You do not get to demand that I respect the very people that are killing those that look like me! You do not have the luxury to sit in your ivory tower and write laws that demand that I respect people who have shown that they have absolutely no respect for Black people!