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hannahdrake628

Hannah L Drake is a blogger, activist, public speaker, poet, and author of 11 books. She writes commentary on politics, feminism, and race and her work has been featured online at Cosmopolitan, The Bitter Southerner, Harper’s Bazaar and Revolt TV. In 2019 during Super Bowl Sunday, Hannah’s poem, "All You Had To Do Was Play The Game, Boy," which addresses the protest by Colin Kaepernick, was shared by film writer, producer and director Ava DuVernay, and then shared by Kaepernick. The poem has been viewed more than two million times.

Hannah’s commentary on life and challenging others to dream bigger have been recognized by First Lady Michelle Obama. Hannah Drake was featured on the Tom Joyner Morning Show with Jacque Reid to discuss her international movement, Do Not Move Off the Sidewalk, which addresses the power of holding your space. Hannah was selected by the Muhammad Ali Center to be a Daughter of Greatness which features prominent women engaged in social philanthropy, activism, and pursuits of justice. Hannah was selected as one of the Best of the Best in Louisville, Kentucky for her poem Spaces and recently was honored as a Kentucky Colonel, the highest title of honor bestowed by the Kentucky Governor recognizing an individual’s noteworthy accomplishments and outstanding service to community, state, and nation. Labeled as a change agent, Hannah’s message is thought-provoking and at times challenging, but Hannah believes that it is in the uncomfortable spaces that change can take place. “My sole purpose in writing and speaking is not that I entertain you. I am trying to shake a nation.”

Dear Jada, Black Women Don’t Need To Get “Entangled” In Rich White Women’s Business

And Jada quickly felt the need to put on her White Savior Entanglement Cape and say, “I understand where you are coming from but let me just be clear. I never want to be the thing that was done to me by White women. I never want to be that.”
Girl please! Jada, on your WORST day, you can NEVER be “the thing” White women have been historically and presently to Black women. EVER. And inviting a privileged White woman on Red Table Talk isn’t going to make White women collectively see the light and change their ways.

Paulette Is All Of Us. STFU & Let Me Drink My Wine In Peace.

But trust me, Paulette is all of us. We are over it. We are done! Zooms invite people into our homes, and home is our reality. Zoom is an illusion. It is a mirage. Our real lives will not always be pretty. Our attitudes will not always be poised. Our real lives don’t have the ability to add fancy backgrounds. Some days this is just it! We are asking people to be normal in a space in time that is abnormal. And we can only pretend for so long. So we must extend people some measure of grace. Paulette simply said what many of us are thinking when we are on a Zoom- PLEASE SHUT THE FUCK UP and let me drink my wine in peace!

They Live Among Us…

To be sure, these White people are not 70 million Ku Klux Klan members. They are not 70 million people decked out in preppy gear walking downtown streets with tiki torches. They are not 70 million people with shaved heads and swastika tattoos. That is the idea that many people need to get out of their heads. These are everyday people that you would see anywhere.

Dear Kerry Washington, Eva Can “Handle” Her Own Business

As Black women we are challenging White women to have difficult conversations with their friends and family. That challenge doesn’t stop for Black women because a White or non-Black person is your friend. The foundation of friendship is truth and honesty.

It is because I am your friend, I am going to challenge you.
It is because I’m your friend, we are going to talk about race.
It is because I am your friend, we are going to address your anti-Blackness.
It is because I am your friend, I am going to let you deal with tough conversations, and I will not be there to rescue you.

And know, as your friend, I am not canceling you, I am challenging you.

To The Next Breonna Taylor…

I am sorry that this city will not care enough to see you. The sad truth is, as a Black woman, this city never saw you in all your beauty and splendor. This city will only care about you to the extent it can extract something from you, and once they have swallowed you whole, they will gladly spit you back out. This city will never see everything you contributed to this community nor understand how your death left holes that cannot be easily filled with plywood adorned with images of your face. I am sorry that this city never cared enough about Black women to get this moment right. I am sorry this city failed you.